Using Social Proof to Market Your Products

social-proof

Social Proof

Buyers base their purchase decisions on many factors, including recommendations from trusted sources. The information doesn’t need to come directly from friends or family, as 70 percent of people accept input from users or organizations they don’t know directly. This social proof also acts as a powerful marketing tool for your products. You show consumers that other people enjoy what you have to offer, which helps them move beyond sales objections. Here are a few ways you can work social proof into your marketing assets.

Testimonials

Incorporate your customer testimonials throughout your marketing materials. You can easily fit in a small section on your landing pages or create a full-blown area on your site. When you do this, potential buyers don’t need to leave your website to find social proof, which means you can minimize distractions on the way to the conversion.

Online Reviews

Many people use online reviews as a critical step in the buyer journey. If you don’t have any reviews at all, you will have a hard time convincing customers to trust you. Encourage reviews by providing current clients with clear instructions on applicable review sites, including your own website. If you’re holding off on requesting these because you don’t want a bad review to sink your sales, you’re putting yourself in a weak position. A mix of good, neutral and bad reviews adds veracity. If you have five-star reviews on every site, potential buyers may worry that they are fake.

Case Studies

Do you offer products and services that are more technical or business-oriented in nature? Case studies not only show off satisfied customers, they also go into detail on exactly how you helped. Decision-makers get the information they need to determine whether your company can assist in resolving their pressing problems.

Famous Users

Do you have celebrities, big name companies or prominent influencers buying from your business? Leverage this information to give your company more authority. For example, technology buyers may be more inclined to use the same vendors as Google or Microsoft. They assume if it’s good enough for famous brands, it’s an excellent fit for their needs. One way to incorporate this social proof into your marketing is to use the logos of companies or websites.

Social proof is a vital component for overcoming sales objections. Your buyers want reassurance that other people or brands recommend your products. By leveraging testimonials, online reviews and other customer input, you help the customer finalize their purchase decision.

Sources:

http://www.nielsen.com/us/en/insights/news/2012/trust-in-advertising–paid-owned-and-earned.html

https://consumerist.com/2015/06/03/nearly-70-of-consumers-rely-on-online-reviews-before-making-a-purchase/

http://laramcculloch.com/word-of-mouth-marketing-strategy/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *